Potential direct losses to the blue crab fishery in Mississippi

July 19, 2019

I would like to provide estimates of the potential direct losses associated with the prolonged and twice opening of the Bonnet Carre Spillway since February 2019 to the blue crab fishery in Mississippi.

One approach to estimate the direct losses of this man-made disaster is to compare the estimated 2019 landings and dockside values to previous years benchmarks. If one-half of the blue crab resources are devastated (50% mortality), the 2019 landings are expected to be around one-half of the average landings during the benchmark period.

For example, the chart below shows the monthly CUMULATIVE dockside values of blue crabs in Mississippi in two benchmark periods, 2012-16 and 2014-16. These dockside values are the most recent monthly values that can be used to estimate the direct losses due to the excessive freshwater intrusion since February 2019.

Using the 2014-16 averages as benchmarks, the cumulative dockside values start at $207,000 in March and end at $1,033,000 in December. Lower starting and ending dockside values are estimated for the 2012-16 benchmark period.

Cumulative-Monthly-Blue-Crab-Dockside-Values-MSSource of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (2019).

It must be emphasized that these estimates cover only blue crab harvesting. There are other significant post-harvest economic activities. Crab picking is a major economic activity in the Northern Gulf of Mexico States.

Finally, economic impacts include direct, indirect and induced effects. The direct losses represent the direct impact of the blue crab fishery. There is also backward and forward interaction of the blue crab fishery with other economic sectors.

Advertisements

Potential Direct Loses to Mississippi Oyster Fishery

July 11, 2019

I received several inquiries for estimates of what the economic impacts of the prolonged and twice opening of the Bonnet Carre Spillway since February 2019 to the oyster fishery in the Northern Gulf of Mexico states.

One approach to estimate the direct losses of this man-made disaster is to compare the 2019 and later years’ landings and dockside values to previous years benchmarks. If all of the oyster resources are totally devastated (100% mortality), the expected 2019 landings will be ZERO. It is very important to have mortality and expected harvest data for the estimation of direct losses.

With almost total devastation of the oyster fishery by Hurricane Katrina, it took more than two years for any significant landings to occur after some serious management intervention by state regulatory agency. It is also expected that in 2020, oyster landings will be very very insignificant if not ZERO without immediate management intervention.

For example, the chart below shows the monthly CUMULATIVE dockside values of oyster landings in Mississippi in two time periods, 2012-16 and 2014-16. These dockside values are the most recent monthly values that can be used to estimate the direct losses due to the excessive freshwater intrusion since February 2019.

Using the 2014-16 averages as benchmarks, the cumulative dockside values starting at $580,000 in March and ending at $1,247,000 in December. The average dockside values during the 2012-16 benchmark period start at $356,000 in March and end at $1,376,00 in December.

Cumulative-Monthly-Oyster-Dockside-Values-MSSource of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (2019).

It must be emphasized that these estimates cover only oyster harvesting. There are other significant post-harvest economic activities. Oyster shucking is a major economic activity in the Northern Gulf of Mexico States. The devastation of the oyster fishery will seriously hamper the processing activities of these establishments. Inclusion of the direct losses to post-harvest economic activities is necessary for the estimation of the economic impacts of the man-made disaster.

Finally, economic impacts include direct, indirect and induced effects. The direct losses represent the direct impact of the oyster fishery. There is also backward and forward interaction of the oyster fishery with other economic sectors.

Economic Contribution of Commercial Oyster Harvesting

July 11, 2019
In this issue, Dr. Posadas describes the long-term trends in the oyster industry in the U.S., the Gulf of Mexico, and Mississippi since 1929. Based on the oyster supply data published by NOAA Fisheries, he estimated the apparent per capita consumption since 1989. The share of imports to the total supply of oyster products had been increasing over time. The most valued imported oyster products were canned oysters, live and fresh farmed and wild oysters, and frozen farmed and wild oysters. The economic contributions of oyster harvesting in the Gulf of Mexico states show the importance of the industry to fishing households, businesses, and communities in the region. The livelihoods and way of life of the fishing households, businesses, and communities dependent on the oyster industry are threatened by the man-made disaster associated with the prolonged and twice opening of the Bonnet Carre spillway since Feb. 2019. 

oyster-dockside-values

The U.S. imported oyster products worth more than $87 million in 2018

More than $87 million worth of oyster products were imported by the U.S. in 2018 (Fig. 1). This amount is almost $10 million more than the previous year’s total oyster imports. All the farmed oyster products contributed more than 40 percent of all oyster imports in 2018. Overall, imported oyster products consisted of 43 percent during the past three decades (Fig. 2). However, the share of imports was highest at 52 percent in 2018.

oyster-imports-2018Figure 1. U.S. Imports of Oyster Products, 2018 ($). Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

oyster-import-shareFigure 2. Share of Imports to Total U.S. Supply of Oyster Products, 2018 (%). Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

 

Retailer of catfish fillets (US Farm raised) in south Missippi

A good friend of mine sent me an email asking about where one can get a couple of cases of catfish fillets (US Farm raised) down there in south MS.

My initial reaction was to go to Mississippi MarketMaker and did a product search at https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/:

  • Typed “Catfish” at the space provided and clicked SEARCH.
  • Clicked ” Food retailer: Fish Market” and clicked search.
  • Clicked “View List”.
  • I selected the nearest seafood and fish market.

Since the business profile of the seafood market was not complete, I searched for it at the Mississippi MarketMaker Facebook page. I checked on the business profile and sent a message. In less than two minutes, I received a replay on my message telling me about the supply, price, and delivery options.

With that, I relayed the information to the person who needed the catfish fillets.

 

 

 

Aquaculture Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

More than 80 local fish farms registered their business profiles in MarketMaker (Fig. 1). Click this LINK to view the search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by state or relevance.  To search for fish farms in MarketMaker, perform the following procedures:

  1. Go to https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/
  2. Type “fish farm” in the search box.
  3. You can sort the search results by relevance and name.
  4. You can also limit online searches by state.

Promote your Aquaculture Products in Season

As a member of MarketMaker, you can promote your food products and services in season at the MarketMaker BUY or SELL Forum. Registration in MarketMaker in the state where your business is located is FREE and simple.
You can view the current listing of products posted at the MarketMaker BUY or SELL Forum at https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/marketplace/category/2.

Figure 1. Local fish farms which registered their business profiles in MarketMaker. Source: https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/. Last accessed: April 17, 2019.

Mississippi is the only Gulf State that allows red drum to be harvested commercially

red-drum-jewell
Red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). Source: Mississippi Saltwater Fish. Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Biloxi, Mississippi. Illustration by Joe Jewell.

The long-term commercial landings of red drum harvested from Mississippi waters are shown below. The commercial landings databases are compiled from the NOAA Fisheries website. The MS Department of Marine Resources set the Total Allowable Catch for red drum from January to December 2019 at 60,000 pounds.

red-drum-landings-values-year-ms
Commercial landings and landing values of red drum in Mississippi. The primary vertical axis shows the yearly commercial landings in pounds. The secondary vertical axis shows the annual commercial dockside values in dollars. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Last visited: March 1, 2019.

There is clearly a huge shortage of supply of wild-caught red drum to satisfy local demand. It was pointed out that  “most red drum which are currently available in the local market is farmed, primarily from Texas, or imported from Latin America.” I had the opportunity to visit one large red drum fish farm in Palacios, Texas.

The dockside prices (EVP) of red drum in Mississippi and the entire Gulf of Mexico states averaged about $2.26 per pound during the past six years. The ex-vessel prices (EVP) were deflated by the consumer price index (2016=100). The average EVP of red drum in the entire United States averaged slightly lower at $2.23 per pound during the past six years after the oil spill.

red-drum-evp-year
The vertical axis shows the average yearly dockside prices in dollars per pound deflated by the consumer price index. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/. Last visited: March 1, 2019.

 

Promote you beef products in MarketMaker

I received a call from a local producer of beef products. He wanted to sell his products online.

One way to promote his beef products online is through the Mississippi Marketmaker.  Register your food and seafood business at the Mississippi MarketMaker —http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com

After doing a quick search, there are more than two dozens of beef producers which are registered in the program. To view the list online, go to https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch?search=beef.

 

Longterm monthly commercial landings of shrimp species in the Gulf of Mexico

Shrimp-landings-monthly-GOM
This chart shows clearly the downward long-term trend in the monthly Gulf of Mexico shrimp landings. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

Shrimp-landings-monthly-LA
This second chart also shows the continuous decline in the long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in Louisiana. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

Shrimp-landings-monthly-MS
This third chart also exhibits the continuous decline in the long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in Mississippi. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

Shrimp-landings-monthly-FLWC
This fourth chart also shows the continuous decline in the long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in the Florida West Coast. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service

Shrimp-landings-monthly-TX
This fifth chart depicts an almost steady long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in Texas. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

Shrimp-landings-monthly-AL
This sixth chart illustrates the increasing long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in Alabama. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: