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Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter - July 12, 2011

 

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Economic contributions of commercial yellowtail snapper fishing

Yellowtail-Snapper2
Figure 1. Yellowtail snapper (Ocyurus chrysurus, Bloch, 1791). The photo was taken by Amanda E. Jefferson.

Commercial Landings

The long-term annual commercial yellowtail snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown below. Since 2011, the Florida West Coast supplied 94.5% of the whole yellowtail snapper domestic landings averaging 2.0 million pounds and valued at $5.9 million annually. The Eastern Atlantic states provided the rest of the total domestic landings. Dockside prices of yellowtail snapper averaged about $3.00 per pound during the past six years.

Yellowtail-Snapper-Annual-Landings-GOM

Figure 2. Annual commercial yellowtail snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: July 5, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

Economic Contributions

The economic contribution commercial yellowtail snapper fishing makes locally, region-wide, or nation-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of yellowtail snapper in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $6.9 million, which was 22.7% more than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Yellowtail snapper fishing in 2016 amounted to $13.2 million. The yellowtail snapper commercial fishing sustained 183 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $4.7 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The yellowtail snapper commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. More than $800,000 was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to almost $400,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

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Economic Contribution of Commercial Red Grouper Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

According to NOAA Fisheries (https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/species/red-grouper), the red grouper (Epinephelus morio) fishery in the Gulf of Mexico is sustainably managed and responsibly harvested under U.S. regulations. Red-grouper-NOAA-Fisheries
Figure 1. Red grouper (Epinephelus morio). Also known as Grouper, Cherna americana, and Negre. Source: FishWatch (https://www.fishwatch.gov/profiles/red-grouper).

The species’ range extends from New England south to Florida and throughout the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean. Like other grouper species, red grouper are protogynous hermaphrodites: they begin their lives as females, and some transform into males when they reach the ages of 7-15.

Commercial fishermen must have a permit to fish, land, or sell red grouper. Managers limit the number of available permits to control the number of fishermen harvesting red grouper. There are annual catch limits for red grouper for the commercial and recreational fisheries.

Commercial Landings

Figure 2 shows the commercial landings of red grouper from the Gulf of Mexico Region. Since 2011, the Gulf States supplied 98.3 % of the entire red grouper domestic landings averaging 5.8 million pounds and valued at $17.7 million annually. Florida West Coast is the largest producing state in the Gulf of Mexico, supplying 98.3% of all domestically-caught red grouper and almost all of the landings in the Gulf of Mexico region.

Red-Grouper-Annual-Landings-GOM
Figure 2. Annual commercial landings of red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Fish Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

In 2016, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of red grouper reached 5.3 million pounds. This fish species was caught year-round with most of the landings occurring during the fall-spring months (Figure 3).

Red-Grouper-Monthly-Landings-GOM
Figure 3. Monthly distribution of commercial landings of red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2016. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

There are more than 100 fishing businesses, seafood processing plants, seafood and fish markets, and seafood restaurants registered in MarketMaker nationwide which harvest, process, sell, and serve grouper in the United States.

Click this LINK to view the search results online. Relevance, distance and alphabetically can be used to sort the online database of fishing businesses. You can also limit online searches by state, county, city or number of miles from a specified location, and type of business.

Economic Contributions of Commercial Fishing Industry

The economic contribution an industry makes locally, region-wide, nation-wide, or globally is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the fishing industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The IMPLAN economic model estimates of the economic contributions regarding output or sales, employment or jobs, labor income, value added and tax revenues. The income, value-added, and output contributions are expressed in dollars for the year specified by the user. Output or sales are the gross sales by businesses within the economic region affected by an activity. Labor income includes personal income including wages and salaries and proprietors’ income or income from self-employment. Employment contributions are expressed in terms of a mix of both full-time and part-time jobs. Value-added is the contribution made to the value of seafood products at each stage of harvesting, processing, and distribution.

The total economic contribution is the sum of direct, indirect and induced effects. The direct effects express the economic impacts in the sector in which the expenditure was initially made. Indirect effects result from changes in the economic activity of other industrial sectors which supply goods or services to the commercial fishing industry. Induced effects are the product of personal consumption expenditures by industry employees.

The annual commercial dockside values of red grouper in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2016 reached $17.8 million, which was 0.9% more than the average annual dockside values since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial red grouper fishing in 2016 amounted to $34 million (Figure 4). The red grouper commercial fishing created 473 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $12.2 million in the Gulf regional economy.

Red-Grouper-Gulf-economic-contribution
Figure 4. The total economic contribution includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2016 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set to 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

The red grouper commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. About $2.1 million was estimated to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were expected to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to $1.0 million as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

For more information, go to Posadas, B.C. and A.E. Jefferson. Commercial Red Grouper Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 8, No. 7, May 29, 2018. http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL TO SEAFOOD, AND COMMERCIAL AND RECREATIONAL FISHING

GOMOS-IMPACT

The National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling (2011) reported that on “April 20, 2010, the Macondo well blew out, costing the lives of 11 men and beginning a catastrophe that sank the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig and spilled nearly 5 million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The spill disrupted an entire region’s economy, damaged fisheries, and critical habitats, and brought vividly to light the risks of deepwater drilling for oil and gas—the latest frontier in the national energy supply.”

The damages to the Gulf of Mexico States (GOM) natural resources due to the 2010 Gulf of Mexico or Deepwater Horizon oil spill (GOMOS) took some time to clean up, and the restoration period to get the resources back to their original pre-GOMOS status is still indefinite. Several restoration projects in affected states are underway (http://www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov/). In the meantime, the production and consumption of goods and services by economic sectors located in the GOM states are adversely affected, leading to a possible reduction in the levels of economic activity, tax revenues, and employment and personal income.

The closures of significant portions of GOM federal and state waters to commercial and saltwater recreational fishing, as well as the closures of beach resources to human uses, due to the GOMOS altered the recreation and consumption decisions of residents and tourists in affected communities. The changes in market perceptions and flow of goods and services generated by the damaged natural resources affected not only households but also communities dependent on these natural resources.

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010 led to closures of significant portions of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) federal and state waters to commercial and recreational fishing and closures of beach resources to human uses. These closures altered the seafood consumption and production decisions of residents and tourists in affected communities. The negative perceptions associated with the oil spill regarding the safety of consuming seafood products from the GOM states has further eroded the region’s share of the domestic seafood markets.

A survey of the direct economic impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on the business operations of participating Mississippi seafood and commercial and saltwater recreational fishing establishments was conducted in 2012. These impacts were measured in terms of the “changes in business operations in 2010 due to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill” in total annual sales, number of workers employed, length of shutdown period and number of claims for financial losses filed and received by participating seafood and marine-related establishments.

The 331 Mississippi marine businesses that participated in the survey contributed between 25% and 65% of the total annual gross sales or total employment in marine economic sectors included in the impact assessment. Oil spill-related closures of state and federal waters adversely impacted the overall business operations of participating establishments, which were shut down, on average, by about 4.21 months. The direct economic impacts of the oil spill on these businesses resulted in a decline in 2010 of almost 50% of the annual total sales and 33% of the total employment as compared with 2009.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/index.html

Source:**Posadas, B.C. 2015. Economic Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to Mississippi Seafood, and Commercial and Recreational Fishing Sectors. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1218, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Florists in the Gulf of Mexico and the United States

Definition of Florists

 Florists (NAICS 453110) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in retailing cut flowers, floral arrangements, and potted plants purchased from others. These establishments usually prepare the arrangements they sell.” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html).

Florists-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual employment and wages, salaries, and earnings of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Figure 1 shows the annual number of jobs in the florist industry which had been declining since 2001. On average, the florist industry directly created more than 140.000 jobs per year in the United States. Figure 2 shows the top 10 states which provided jobs in the florist industry in 2017. The state of California topped the list contributing 11.87% of all the jobs in the industry and followed by the state of Texas with 8.19 percent of all the industry jobs.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been falling during most of the early part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged more than $24,500 per person during the entire period (Figure 1).

Top-10-states-jobs-florists-USA
Figure 2. U.S. top 10 states in fruit and vegetable markets by percent of jobs in 2017.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed more than 24,800 jobs or 17.51 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 3). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 1.19 and 1.89 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been fluctuating during the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged about $24,000 per person (at constant 2017 prices) or 97.96 percent of the national average (Figure 3). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 83.11 and 81.69 percent of the national average, respectively.

Florists-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 3. Annual employment and wages, salaries, and earnings of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Mar. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 28.6 percent were males (Figure 4). Majority of the workers and owners were females (71.4%). In the Gulf States, similar proportions of men and women worked and owned these businesses.

Florists-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 4. Gender distribution of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Mar. 2018) sorted workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 5). The majority of the workers and owners are White (81.2%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (12.9%), African American (2.5%), and Asian (2.0%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White (72.4%) and Asian (0.8%) and more Hispanic (21.4%) and African American (4.8%) people are working in these businesses.

Florists-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 5. Race or ethnic distribution of QCEW Employees, non-QCEW Employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors.  Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview circulated by EMSI (Mar. 2018) grouped workers and owners by age (Figure 6). About 43.7 percent of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners involved 20.7 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 16.5 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners included 19.0 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are slightly younger (48.44 years) as compared to the national average (48.86 years).

Florists-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 6. Age distribution of QCEW Employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

If you need an online directory of these businesses, you can perform the following search at the Mississippi MarketMaker (https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/) or other member states (https://foodmarketmaker.com/). Click this link to start your search —https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/. Then type the name of the food product you are interested, for example, cut flowers, edible flowers.

The results of the search show that there are 336 cut and edible flower growers registered in MarketMaker respectively (Figure 7). About 38 cut and edible flower growers are registered in the five Gulf of Mexico States. There are 10 and four cut and edible flower growers registered in Mississippi and Alabama MarketMaker, respectively.

Florists-MS
Figure 7. Directory of cut and edible flower businesses registered in MarketMaker. Click this link to start your search — https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker. 

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fruit and Vegetable Markets in the Gulf of Mexico and the United States

Definition of Fruit and Vegetable Markets

Fruit and vegetable markets (NAICS 445230) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in retailing fresh fruits and vegetables” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html). Examples of establishments listed by the Bureau of Census includes the following:

  • Fruit and vegetable stands, permanent
  • Fruit markets
  • Fruit stands, permanent
  • Produce markets
  • Produce stands, permanent
  • Vegetable markets

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Table 1 shows the number of jobs in the entire industry since 2001. On average, the industry directly created about 54,000 jobs per year in the United States. Figure 2 shows the top 10 states which provided jobs in the fruit and vegetable markets in 2017. The state of New York topped the list contributing 13.7% of all the jobs in the industry and followed closely by the state of California with 12.8 percent of all the industry jobs.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been falling during most of the early part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged more than $35,000 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Fruits-Vegetables--Markets-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Top-10-states-jobs-fruit-vegetable-markets-USA
Figure 2. The top 10 states in fruit and vegetable markets by percent of jobs in 2017.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed more than 7,700 jobs or 14.41 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 3). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.43 and 1.20 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been decreasing during most of the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged about $34,800 per person (at constant 2017 prices) or 98.26 percent of the national average (Figure 3). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 63.13 and 82.38 percent of the national average, respectively.

Fruits-Vegetables--Markets-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 3. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Mar. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 54,2 percent were males (Figure 4). About 45.8 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, similar proportions of men and women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 4. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Mar. 2018) sorted workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 5). The majority of the workers and owners are White (63.3%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (20.4%), African American (8.1%), and Asian (6.7%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White (57.0%), African American (7.9%), and Asian (5.5%) and more Hispanic (28.6%) people are working in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 5. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.  Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview circulated by EMSI (Mar. 2018) grouped workers and owners by age (Figure 6). About 22.8 percent of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners involved 19.6 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 18.7 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners included 21.3 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are slightly older (41.79 years) as compared to the national average (40.51 years).

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 6. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

If you need an online database of these businesses, you can perform the following search at the Mississippi MarketMaker (https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/) or other member states (https://foodmarketmaker.com/):

Keywords: Fruit & Vegetable » States: AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, or WY » Type: Food Retailer » Profile: Food Retailer > Fruit & Vegetable Market

More than 12,600 fruit and vegetable markets registered their business profiles in MarketMaker (Figure 7). Click this LINK to view the entire search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by relevance, or by the distance to your current location.

About 2,000 fruit and vegetable businesses are registered in the five Gulf of Mexico States. In Mississippi and Alabama, there are 75 and 159 fruit and vegetable markets registered in MarketMaker, respectively.

 Fruit-vegetable-busimesses
Figure 7. Map of fruit and vegetable market registered in MarketMaker. Click this LINK to view all the search results. 

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.