Commercial White Shrimp Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

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During the last five years, the Gulf States supplied 94.3% of the wild American white shrimp amounting to 91.3 million pounds and valued at $204.2 million per year. Louisiana is the largest producing state of wild American white shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico, followed by Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida.

White-Shrimp-Annual-Gulf

In 2015, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of white shrimp reached about 86.1 million pounds. This shrimp species was caught year-round with most of the landings occurring from August to December. There are more than 3,300 fishing businesses, processing plants, seafood and fish markets, and seafood restaurants registered in MarketMaker which harvest, process, sell, and serve shrimp in the United States. Click this LINK to view the search results online.

White-Shrimp-Monthly-Gulf

 

Pecan Production in Mississippi and United States

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Pecan Growers Registered in MarketMaker 

There are 221 pecan growers registered in MarketMaker member states. Click this LINK to view the search results online.  In Mississippi, 19 pecan growers are registered, as shown by this online LINK.

Annual Volume and Value of Pecan Production

According to USDA Quick Stats, the major pecan-producing states in 2015 were Georgia (36%), New Mexico (33%), Texas (13%), and Arizona (9%). Fig. 1 shows the annual volume and value of utilized and in-shell pecan production in the United States since 2007. Annual pecan production in all producing states averaged 280 million pounds while annual value was around $500 million.

pecan-USAFig. 1. Annual volume and value of United States pecan production
Source: USDA (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/)

Fig. 2 shows the yearly quantity and value of utilized and in-shell pecan production in Mississippi since 2007. The market share of Mississippi to the total domestic pecan production averaged less than 1% since 2007. Annual pecan production in the state was around 2.8 million pounds while annual value was about $3.5 million.

pecan-MS
Fig. 3. Annual volume and value of Mississippi pecan production
Source: USDA (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/)

Mississippi pecans were sold at significantly lower prices than in all producing states. Fig. 3 shows the average prices of pecan production in Mississippi and United States since 2007. Mississippi pecans were sold at an average price of $1.28 per pound, which was about 73% of the average prices in all producing states. The average price of pecans in all producing states was $1.79 per pound.

pecan-pricesFig. 3. Average prices of pecan production
Source: USDA (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/)

 

Agritourism Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

As defined by the University of California Cooperative Extension, Small Farm Program, “agritourism is a commercial enterprise at a working farm, ranch, or agricultural plant conducted for the enjoyment of visitors that generates supplemental income for the owner. Agritourism and nature-tourism enterprises might include: (1) Outdoor recreation (fishing, hunting, wildlife study, horseback riding), (2) Educational experiences (cannery tours, cooking classes, or wine tasting), (3) Entertainment (harvest festivals or barn dances), (4) Hospitality services (farm stays, guided tours or outfitter services), (5) On-farm direct sales (u-pick operations or roadside stands).”

According to the USDA NASS 2012 Census of Agriculture Highlights, over 33,000 farms offered agritourism and recreational services such as farm or winery tours, hayrides, hunting, fishing, and other such activities in 2012. MSU Extension Service experts on agritourism state that “agritourism can benefit Mississippi’s farmers, landowners, and community members. Specifically, agritourism can positively impact education, agriculture, income, and employment.”

In 2014, total expenditures on fishing trips made by for-hire boats created economic impacts of $3.1 billion and generated more than 24,000 jobs in the United States (NOAA Economics Program). These estimates exclude expenditures on durable equipment by for-hire boats.

Total hunting expenditures made by 13.7 million hunters in 2011 reached $34 billion in the United States (U.S. Fish & Wildlife). This estimate includes expenditures on durable equipment by hunters.

The tourism sector in MarketMaker includes agritourism, fishing charter, and hunting businesses. There are more than 2,300 tourism businesses registered in MarketMaker. Using Search, we can create an online database of the three types of tourism business. Click this LINK to view the online database of 2,300 tourism businesses.

When Search is limited to Mississippi businesses only, there are currently 60 agritourism, fishing charter, and hunting businesses. A selection of the Search results are shown in a database and map (Figure 1) generated by MarketMaker. Click this LINK to view the online database of 60 tourism businesses operating in Mississippi. Of the 60 businesses, 26 are fishing charters, and one offers hunting services.

Figure 1. Online database and map of Mississippi tourism businesses generated by Search.
Figure 1. Online database and map of Mississippi tourism businesses generated by Search.

Another MarketMaker tool can be used to create an online database and map of tourism businesses. Using Market Research, an online list and map of all the tourism businesses in Mississippi (Figure 2) can be generated by performing the following steps:

Go to http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/market_research.
Under Advance Filters, select Tourism and click Done.
Click Submit Search.

In order to limit the Market Research to agritourism businesses only in Mississippi, the procedures are as follows:

Go to http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/market_research.
Under Advance Filters, select Tourism, and Agritourism, and click Done.
Click Submit Search.

Figure 2. Online database and map of Mississippi tourism businesses generated by Market Research.
Figure 2. Online database and map of Mississippi tourism businesses generated by Market Research.

More than 36,000 web users visited Mississippi MarketMaker since May 2014 (Figure 3). These web users visited more than 76,000 pages and opened about two pages per visit.

Figure 3. Google Web Analytics of Mississippi MarketMaker from May 2014 to present. Source: Mississippi MarketMaker (http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/).
Figure 3. Google Web Analytics of Mississippi MarketMaker from May 2014 to present. Source: Mississippi MarketMaker (http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/). 

Commercial Striped Mullet Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

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Striped Mullet Commercial Landings

According to Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/), striped mullet (Fig. 1) which are also known as popeye mullet, black mullet, or gray mullet are wild-caught in fresh and salt waters mostly from West Florida, Alabama, and Louisiana. More than 100 mullet species are found worldwide (http://www.seafoodsource.com/).
91Striped_Mullet1000_Rev4
Figure 1. Striped mullet (Mugil cephalus). Source: Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/).

Fig. 2 shows the commercial landings of striped mullet harvested from the Gulf of Mexico Region since 2000. The commercial landings databases were compiled from the NOAA Fisheries website. On average, about 12.7 million pounds were landed each year since 2011. The Gulf States supplied 81 percent of the striped mullet in the United States valued at $9.8 million per year during the last five years.

Striped-Mullet-Annual-Gulf.jpgFig. 2. Annual commercial striped mullet landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Striped Mullet Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

In 2015, the Gulf-wide landings of commercial striped mullet fishing reached about 10.6 million pounds. The fish species was caught year-round with almost two-thirds of the landings reported from November to January (Fig. 3).

Mullet-Striped-Season.jpg
Fig. 3. Monthly commercial striped mullet landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

There are 37 fishing businesses, seafood and fish markets registered in MarketMaker which harvest, process, and sell striped mullet. Click this LINK to view the search results online. Since May 2014, more than 36,000 web users visited the Mississippi MarketMaker website (Fig. 4). These web users visited more than 76,000 webpages and stayed about 86 seconds per visit.

Google-Analytics-MS-MM.jpg
Fig 4. Google Web Analytics of Mississippi MarketMaker from May 2014 to present. Source: Mississippi MarketMaker (http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/).

Economic Contribution of Striped Mullet Commercial Fishing

The economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy was estimated using IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States. Sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data was used in the economic analysis. The total commercial landing values of this saltwater fish species in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2015 reached $7.3 million. The total economic contribution of commercial fishing in 2015 amounted to $14.3 million (Fig. 5). Commercial fishing created 196 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $5.2 million in the Gulf regional economy.

Striped-Mullet-Gulf-economic-contribution
Fig 5. Total economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2015 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. Local purchases percentage was set to 100%.

 

Mississippi, Gulf of Mexico and United States commercial shrimp landings, imports and consumption

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In order to understand the magnitude of the negative economic impacts of natural and technological disasters to Commercial shrimping in the coastal counties, multi-year baseline economic information about the sector in all the five Gulf of Mexico (GOM) states are currently being compiled from various secondary sources.

Commercial shrimping corresponds to economic sector 114112 (Shellfish Fishing) in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS). Shellfish fishing comprises establishments primarily engaged in the commercial catching or taking of shellfish (e.g., clams, crabs, lobsters, mussels, oysters, sea urchins, shrimp) from their natural habitat.

The combined annual commercial shrimp landings (in million pounds, headless) and landing values (in million dollars at current prices), imports and per capita consumption in Missisippi, Gulf of Mexico States, and United States are shown in the figures below.

gom
gulf
usa
percent
Percent
Supply
Imports
consumption
Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

Posadas, Benedict C. 2016. Gulf of Mexico July Shrimp Landings and Exvessel Prices. Mississippi MArketMaker Newsletter, Volume 6, Issue 16. August 23, 2016.

Posadas, Benedict C. 2016. Economic Impacts of Mississippi Shrimp Industry in 2015. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 6, Issue 20, Dec. 13, 2016.

Posadas, Benedict C. Know Your Local Seafood Business Handling Shrimp Products! Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 6, Issue 3, Feb. 9, 2016.

Mississippi, Gulf of Mexico and United States commercial oyster landings, imports and consumption

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In order to understand the magnitude of the negative economic impacts of natural and technological disasters to Commercial Oystering in the coastal counties, multi-year baseline economic information about the sector in all the five Gulf of Mexico (GOM) states are currently being compiled from various secondary sources.

Commercial Oystering corresponds to economic sector 114112 (Shellfish Fishing) in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS). Shellfish Fishing comprises establishments primarily engaged in the commercial catching or taking of shellfish (e.g., clams, crabs, lobsters, mussels, oysters, sea urchins, shrimp) from their natural habitat.

The annual commercial oyster landings, imports and per capita consumption in Mississippi, Gulf of Mexico States, and United States (in million pounds of meat) and landing values (in million dollars at current prices) are shown in the figures below.

ms
gom
usa
gulf
imports
consume

Posadas, B.C. and B.K.A. Posadas, Jr. 2017. Economic Impacts of the Opening of the Bonnet Carre Spillway to the Mississippi Oyster Fishery. Mississippi State University Extension Service publication 2846 and Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant publication MASGP-11-041. Mississippi State, Mississippi.

Posadas, B.C. Mississippi Oyster Season to Open in October. Mississippi MarketMaker Newsletter, Vol. 6, Issue 18, September 28, 2016.

Posadas, Benedict C., Benedict Kit A. Posadas, Jr., and Cassandra Jones. 2013. Annual Commercial Oyster Landings and Landing Values in the Gulf States, 2000-2012. Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center, Biloxi, Mississippi.

Commercial Red Drum Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico Region

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Red Drum Commercial Landings

According to Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/), red drum (Fig. 1, sciaenops ocellatus) are also known as “channel bass, redfish, reds, spottail bass.  The commercial harvest and sale of red drum is prohibited in Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, and Florida state waters and Gulf federal waters. As a result, Mississippi accounts for all commercial red drum landings in the Gulf”.

Figure 1. Red drum.  Source: Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/).
Figure 1. Red drum.
Source: Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/).

 

Fig. 2 shows the commercial landings of red drum harvested from the Gulf of Mexico Region since 2000. The commercial landings databases are compiled from the National Marine Fisheries Service website. On average, about 31,528 pounds of red drum were landed each year (standard deviation = ± 11,562) from Jan. 2000 to Dec. 2015. Since 2000, Mississippi supplies 19 percent of total domestic landings, while 78 percent are landed from North Carolina. There is clearly a huge shortage of supply of wild-caught red drum to satisfy local demand. As stated in Gulf FINFO website, “most red drum which are currently available in the local market is farmed, primarily from Texas, or imported from Latin America.”

Fig. 2. Annual commercial red drum landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region.  Source: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).
Fig. 2. Annual commercial red drum landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region.
Source: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Red Drum Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

Thirty-three charter boats for-hire businesses registered in MarketMaker offer to take recreational fishermen to catch red drum. Click this LINK to view the search results online.

Twelve seafood and fish markets registered in MarketMaker sell red drum. Click this LINK to view the search results online.

Economic Contribution of Red Drum Commercial Fishing

The economic contribution of red drum commercial fishing to the Mississippi economy was estimated using IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for Mississippi. Sector 17 of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data, the commercial fishing sector, was used to represent commercial red drum fishing. The base IMPLAN model estimated the economic contribution of commercial red drum fishing with the assumption that the local purchases coefficient was 100%.

The total landing values of red drum in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2015 reached $155,493, which were all harvested from Mississippi state waters. The total economic contribution of commercial red drum fishing in 2015 reached $237.2 thousand (Fig. 3). Commercial red snapper fishing created 3.8 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $95.8 thousand in Mississippi.

Figure 3. Total economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2015 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. Local purchases percentage was set to 100%. Dollars are rounded to nearest $1,000.
Figure 3. Total economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2015 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. Local purchases percentage was set to 100%. Dollars are rounded to nearest $1,000.

Commercial Spotted Seatrout Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico Region

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Spotted Seatrout Commercial Landings

According to Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/), “spotted seatrout (Fig. 1) which are also known as speckled trout, are found in coastal waters of the western Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Florida and throughout the entire Gulf of Mexico. They are most common along the northern Gulf and Florida Gulf Coast.”

a drawing of a spotted seatrout
Figure 1. Spotted seatrout (Cynoscion Nebulosus).
Source: Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/).
Fig. 2 shows the commercial landings of spotted seatrout harvested from the Gulf of Mexico Region since 2000. The commercial landings databases are compiled from the NOAA Fisheries website. On average, about 70,000 pounds were landed each year (standard deviation ± 34,000) from Jan. 2000 to Dec. 2015. Since 2000, Mississippi landed about 10 percent of total domestic harvest, and 58 percent were from North Carolina. About 59 percent of Gulf-wide landings in 2000-2015 came from Mississippi while West Coast Florida landed 22 percent.
Gulf of Mexico Region Commercial Spotted Seatrout Landings
Fig. 2. Annual commercial spotted seatrout landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region.
Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries ( http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Seatrout Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

In 2015, the Gulf-wide landings of commercial spotted seatrout fishing reached about 38,000 pounds. The fish species was caught from February to November with the bulk of the landings reported between April and August (Fig. 3).

Thirty-three charter boats for-hire businesses registered in MarketMaker offer to take recreational fishermen to catch seatrout.  Click this LINK to view the search results online.  For details, you can view the individual business profiles of these businesses listed in MarketMaker.

Eight seafood and fish markets registered in MarketMaker sell seatrout. Click this LINK to view the search results online.  For details, you can view the individual business profiles of these businesses registered in MarketMaker.

Monthly Commercial Spotted Seatrout Landings in the Gulf States
Fig. 3. Monthly commercial spotted seatrout landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region.
Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries ( http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Economic Contribution of Spotted Seatrout Commercial Fishing

The economic contribution of spotted seatrout commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy was estimated using IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States. Sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data was used to represent commercial spotted seatrout fishing.

The total commercial landing values of spotted seatrout in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2015 reached $109,669. The total economic contribution of commercial spotted seatrout fishing in 2015 amounted to $216 thousand (Fig. 4). Commercial spotted seatrout fishing created 2.7 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $84.1 thousand in the Gulf regional economy.

Economic contribution of commercial spotted seatrout fishing inthe Gulf States in 2015.
Figure 4. Total economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2015 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. Local purchases percentage was set to 100%. Dollars are rounded to nearest $1,000.

Commercial Red Snapper Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico Region

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According to Gulf FINFO, “red snapper (Fig.1, Lutjanus campechanus) is also known as American red snapper, American reds, Caribbean red snapper, genuine red snapper, Mexican snapper, Northern red snapper, and snapper.” This fish species is sought by avid recreational fishermen and commercial fishing businesses in the Gulf of Mexico States. The Gulf red snapper fisheries are managed by NOAA Fisheries, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (http://gulfcouncil.org/), and individual states.
58redsnapper_1000_sig
Fig. 1. Red snapper. Source: Gulf FINFO (http://www.gsmfc.org/).

FishWatch (http://www.fishwatch.gov/) describes the “U.S. wild-caught red snapper as a smart seafood choice because it is sustainably managed under rebuilding plans that allow limited harvest by U.S. fishermen.”  Fig. 2 shows the monthly commercial landings of this favored fish species in the Gulf of Mexico States since 2000. Monthly commercial landings were compiled from the National Marine Fisheries Service website. Until the end of 2005, no landings of red snapper were reported during some summer months. A downward trend in the monthly commercial red snapper landings is very pronounced from Jan. 2000 to the first six months in 2010. Since the latter half of 2010, the monthly commercial landings of red snapper continued to increase up to the end of 2015.

red-snapper-gulfFig. 2. Monthly commercial red snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region.
Source: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Red Snapper Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

More than 8,000 fishing, seafood and tourism businesses registered in MarketMaker harvest, process, sell or serve red snapper. When the search was limited to Mississippi only, there are 91 red snapper establishments. Click this LINK to view the search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by relevance, or by distance to your current location.

Economic Contribution of Red Snapper Commercial Fishing

The economic contribution of red snapper commercial fishing to the Gulf regional economy was estimated using IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the Gulf States namely, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. Sector 17 of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data, the commercial fishing sector, was used to represent commercial red snapper fishing. The base IMPLAN model estimated the economic contribution of commercial red snapper fishing with the assumption that the local purchases coefficient was 100%. The total economic contribution in the Gulf of Mexico Region of commercial red snapper fishing in 2015 reached $53.7 million (Table 1). Commercial red snapper fishing created 734 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $19.4 million in the five Gulf States.

Table 1. Economic contribution of commercial red snapper fishing in the Gulf of Mexico Region
Impact type Employment

impact

(Jobs)

Income impact
(Million dollars)
Value added impact
(Million dollars)
Output impact
(Million dollars)
Direct Effect 598 11.9 14.7 28.0
Indirect Effect 44 3.0 5.8 12.5
Induced Effect 92 4.4 8.1 13.2
Total Effect 734 19.4 28.6 53.7

Total economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2015 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. Local purchases percentage was set to 100%. Dollars are rounded to nearest $100,000.

Economic Contributions of Mississippi Shrimp Harvesting and Processing in 2015

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Estimates of the economic contributions of the Mississippi commercial shrimp industry were broken down by sector – harvesting, processing, and distribution. Economic contributions were estimated by using IMPLAN (Impacts for Planning) Version 3.1 software and the 2013 Mississippi input-output data.

Shrimp Harvesting

The commercial shrimp industry consisted of the harvesting, processing, and distribution of shrimp products. Commercial harvesting included commercial fishermen using various gears on board vessels (>5 tons) and boats (

Table 1. Mississippi commercial shrimp harvesting and processing production in 2015
Sector Million pounds Million dollars
Shrimp Harvesting1 10.1 11.5
Shrimp Processing2 30.0 100.0
Total 40.1 111.5
Sources of raw data:
1 – NOAA Fisheries, Office of Science and Technology, Fisheries Statistics Division. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/pls/webpls/MF_ANNUAL_LANDINGS.RESULTS. Last accessed: Dec. 12, 2016.
2 – American Shrimp Processors Association, Biloxi, MS. Personal communication. Dec. 10, 2016.

Shrimp Processing

The shrimp processing industry involved plants engaged in primary wholesale and processing. It was represented by IMPLAN sector 61 or seafood product preparation and packaging sector. The annual volumes and plant-gate values of shrimp processing in 2015 were provided by the American Shrimp Processors Association (Table 1). Over time, the processing capacity of local plants continued to exceed the local harvest of seafood products. Local shrimp processing plants remained heavily dependent on imports of shrimp products from other producing states and foreign suppliers. In 2015, the local purchases coefficient as measured by the ratio between local shrimp landings and the total quantity of processed products was about 34%. This ratio implies that 66% of total shrimp processed were imported from other producing states and foreign suppliers.

Shrimp Distribution

Shrimp distribution included seafood wholesalers, seafood and fish markets and seafood restaurants handling various shrimp products. Shrimp wholesaling included secondary wholesale and processing activities dealing with shrimp products. Shrimp retailing referred to seafood and fish markets handling shrimp products. Shrimp restaurants dealt with retail trade from food service handling shrimp products. Shrimp distribution was not included in the present analysis due to lack of appropriate data in the year 2015.

Shrimp Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

More than 800 seafood businesses registered in MarketMaker harvest, process, sell or serve shrimp products. When the search was limited to Mississippi only, the number of seafood establishments was at least 22. Click this LINK to view the search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by relevance, or by their distance to your current location.

Economic Contributions of Shrimp Harvesting

The base IMPLAN model estimated the economic contributions of shrimp harvesting with the assumption that the local purchases coefficient was 100%. The total economic contributions of commercial shrimp harvesting in 2015 reached $17.4 million (Table 2). Shrimp harvesting created 283 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $7 million.

Table 2. Base estimates of the economic contributions1 of Mississippi commercial shrimp harvesting2 in 2015
Impact type Employment
impact
(Jobs)
Income impact
(Million
dollars)
Value added
impact
(Million dollars)
Output impact
(Million
dollars)
Direct Effect 243 5.4 6.4 11.7
Indirect Effect 10 0.5 0.8 2.0
Induced Effect 30 1.2 2.2 3.7
Total Effect 283 7.0 9.4 17.4
  1. Economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using Table 1 values and 2013 IMPLAN data. Local purchases percentage was set to 100%.
  2. 2013 IMPLAN sector 17 or commercial fishing sector.

Economic Contributions of Shrimp Processing

The base IMPLAN model estimated the economic contributions of shrimp processing based on the default assumption that the local purchases coefficient set by the model was 65%. In other words, imports processed by local processing plants consisted of 35% of the total quantity of shrimp products processed. The results showed that the total economic contributions of commercial shrimp processing in 2015 amounted to $105.1 million (Table 3). Shrimp processing produced 546 jobs and labor income reaching $16.8 million.

Table 3. Base estimates of the economic contributions1 of Mississippi commercial shrimp processing in 2015
Impact type Employment
impact
(Jobs)
Income impact
(Million
dollars)
Value added
impact
(Million dollars)
Output impact
(Million
dollars)
Direct Effect 175 6.4 6.9 66.4
Indirect Effect 298 7.6 15.7 29.8
Induced Effect 73 2.8 5.4 9.0
Total Effect 546 16.8 28 105.1
  1. Economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using Table 1 values and 2013 IMPLAN data. Local purchases percentage set by the IMPLAN model at 65%.
  2. 2013 IMPLAN sector 61 or seafood product preparation and packaging sector.

However, when the local purchases coefficient was adjusted to the ratio between local shrimp landings and quantity of processed products at about 34% or that imports consisted 66% of the total quantity of shrimp processed, the IMPLAN model generated lower estimates of the economic contributions of shrimp processing. The total economic contributions of commercial shrimp processing in 2015 amounted to $54.9 million (Table 4). Shrimp processing created 285 jobs and labor income was $8.8 million.

Table 4. Adjusted estimates of the economic contributions1 of Mississippi commercial shrimp processing in 2015
Impact type Employment
impact
(Jobs)
Income impact
(Million
dollars)
Value added
impact
(Million dollars)
Output impact
(Million
dollars)
Direct Effect 91 3.3 3.6 34.7
Indirect Effect 156 4.0 8.2 15.6
Induced Effect 38 1.5 2.8 4.7
Total Effect 285 8.8 14.6 54.9
  1. Economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using Table 1 values and 2013 IMPLAN data. Using shrimp landings and processing volumes, the local purchases percentage was set at 34%.
  2. 2013 IMPLAN sector 61 or seafood product preparation and packaging sector.