ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL TO SEAFOOD, AND COMMERCIAL AND RECREATIONAL FISHING

GOMOS-IMPACT

The National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling (2011) reported that on “April 20, 2010, the Macondo well blew out, costing the lives of 11 men and beginning a catastrophe that sank the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig and spilled nearly 5 million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The spill disrupted an entire region’s economy, damaged fisheries, and critical habitats, and brought vividly to light the risks of deepwater drilling for oil and gas—the latest frontier in the national energy supply.”

The damages to the Gulf of Mexico States (GOM) natural resources due to the 2010 Gulf of Mexico or Deepwater Horizon oil spill (GOMOS) took some time to clean up, and the restoration period to get the resources back to their original pre-GOMOS status is still indefinite. Several restoration projects in affected states are underway (http://www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov/). In the meantime, the production and consumption of goods and services by economic sectors located in the GOM states are adversely affected, leading to a possible reduction in the levels of economic activity, tax revenues, and employment and personal income.

The closures of significant portions of GOM federal and state waters to commercial and saltwater recreational fishing, as well as the closures of beach resources to human uses, due to the GOMOS altered the recreation and consumption decisions of residents and tourists in affected communities. The changes in market perceptions and flow of goods and services generated by the damaged natural resources affected not only households but also communities dependent on these natural resources.

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010 led to closures of significant portions of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) federal and state waters to commercial and recreational fishing and closures of beach resources to human uses. These closures altered the seafood consumption and production decisions of residents and tourists in affected communities. The negative perceptions associated with the oil spill regarding the safety of consuming seafood products from the GOM states has further eroded the region’s share of the domestic seafood markets.

A survey of the direct economic impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on the business operations of participating Mississippi seafood and commercial and saltwater recreational fishing establishments was conducted in 2012. These impacts were measured in terms of the “changes in business operations in 2010 due to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill” in total annual sales, number of workers employed, length of shutdown period and number of claims for financial losses filed and received by participating seafood and marine-related establishments.

The 331 Mississippi marine businesses that participated in the survey contributed between 25% and 65% of the total annual gross sales or total employment in marine economic sectors included in the impact assessment. Oil spill-related closures of state and federal waters adversely impacted the overall business operations of participating establishments, which were shut down, on average, by about 4.21 months. The direct economic impacts of the oil spill on these businesses resulted in a decline in 2010 of almost 50% of the annual total sales and 33% of the total employment as compared with 2009.

Read more at http://gomos.msstate.edu/index.html

Source:**Posadas, B.C. 2015. Economic Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to Mississippi Seafood, and Commercial and Recreational Fishing Sectors. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Bulletin 1218, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

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Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Florists in the Gulf of Mexico and the United States

Definition of Florists

 Florists (NAICS 453110) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in retailing cut flowers, floral arrangements, and potted plants purchased from others. These establishments usually prepare the arrangements they sell.” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html).

Florists-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual employment and wages, salaries, and earnings of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Figure 1 shows the annual number of jobs in the florist industry which had been declining since 2001. On average, the florist industry directly created more than 140.000 jobs per year in the United States. Figure 2 shows the top 10 states which provided jobs in the florist industry in 2017. The state of California topped the list contributing 11.87% of all the jobs in the industry and followed by the state of Texas with 8.19 percent of all the industry jobs.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been falling during most of the early part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged more than $24,500 per person during the entire period (Figure 1).

Top-10-states-jobs-florists-USA
Figure 2. U.S. top 10 states in fruit and vegetable markets by percent of jobs in 2017.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed more than 24,800 jobs or 17.51 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 3). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 1.19 and 1.89 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been fluctuating during the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged about $24,000 per person (at constant 2017 prices) or 97.96 percent of the national average (Figure 3). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 83.11 and 81.69 percent of the national average, respectively.

Florists-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 3. Annual employment and wages, salaries, and earnings of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Mar. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 28.6 percent were males (Figure 4). Majority of the workers and owners were females (71.4%). In the Gulf States, similar proportions of men and women worked and owned these businesses.

Florists-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 4. Gender distribution of QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Mar. 2018) sorted workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 5). The majority of the workers and owners are White (81.2%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (12.9%), African American (2.5%), and Asian (2.0%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White (72.4%) and Asian (0.8%) and more Hispanic (21.4%) and African American (4.8%) people are working in these businesses.

Florists-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 5. Race or ethnic distribution of QCEW Employees, non-QCEW Employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors.  Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview circulated by EMSI (Mar. 2018) grouped workers and owners by age (Figure 6). About 43.7 percent of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners involved 20.7 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 16.5 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners included 19.0 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are slightly younger (48.44 years) as compared to the national average (48.86 years).

Florists-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 6. Age distribution of QCEW Employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

If you need an online directory of these businesses, you can perform the following search at the Mississippi MarketMaker (https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/) or other member states (https://foodmarketmaker.com/). Click this link to start your search —https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/. Then type the name of the food product you are interested, for example, cut flowers, edible flowers.

The results of the search show that there are 336 cut and edible flower growers registered in MarketMaker respectively (Figure 7). About 38 cut and edible flower growers are registered in the five Gulf of Mexico States. There are 10 and four cut and edible flower growers registered in Mississippi and Alabama MarketMaker, respectively.

Florists-MS
Figure 7. Directory of cut and edible flower businesses registered in MarketMaker. Click this link to start your search — https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/main/mmsearch/.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker. 

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fruit and Vegetable Markets in the Gulf of Mexico and the United States

Definition of Fruit and Vegetable Markets

Fruit and vegetable markets (NAICS 445230) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in retailing fresh fruits and vegetables” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html). Examples of establishments listed by the Bureau of Census includes the following:

  • Fruit and vegetable stands, permanent
  • Fruit markets
  • Fruit stands, permanent
  • Produce markets
  • Produce stands, permanent
  • Vegetable markets

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Table 1 shows the number of jobs in the entire industry since 2001. On average, the industry directly created about 54,000 jobs per year in the United States. Figure 2 shows the top 10 states which provided jobs in the fruit and vegetable markets in 2017. The state of New York topped the list contributing 13.7% of all the jobs in the industry and followed closely by the state of California with 12.8 percent of all the industry jobs.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been falling during most of the early part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged more than $35,000 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Fruits-Vegetables--Markets-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Top-10-states-jobs-fruit-vegetable-markets-USA
Figure 2. The top 10 states in fruit and vegetable markets by percent of jobs in 2017.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed more than 7,700 jobs or 14.41 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 3). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.43 and 1.20 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been decreasing during most of the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged about $34,800 per person (at constant 2017 prices) or 98.26 percent of the national average (Figure 3). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 63.13 and 82.38 percent of the national average, respectively.

Fruits-Vegetables--Markets-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 3. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Mar. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 54,2 percent were males (Figure 4). About 45.8 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, similar proportions of men and women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 4. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Mar. 2018) sorted workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 5). The majority of the workers and owners are White (63.3%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (20.4%), African American (8.1%), and Asian (6.7%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White (57.0%), African American (7.9%), and Asian (5.5%) and more Hispanic (28.6%) people are working in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 5. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.  Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview circulated by EMSI (Mar. 2018) grouped workers and owners by age (Figure 6). About 22.8 percent of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners involved 19.6 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 18.7 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners included 21.3 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are slightly older (41.79 years) as compared to the national average (40.51 years).

Fruit-Vegetable-Markets-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 6. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com. Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

If you need an online database of these businesses, you can perform the following search at the Mississippi MarketMaker (https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/) or other member states (https://foodmarketmaker.com/):

Keywords: Fruit & Vegetable » States: AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, or WY » Type: Food Retailer » Profile: Food Retailer > Fruit & Vegetable Market

More than 12,600 fruit and vegetable markets registered their business profiles in MarketMaker (Figure 7). Click this LINK to view the entire search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by relevance, or by the distance to your current location.

About 2,000 fruit and vegetable businesses are registered in the five Gulf of Mexico States. In Mississippi and Alabama, there are 75 and 159 fruit and vegetable markets registered in MarketMaker, respectively.

 Fruit-vegetable-busimesses
Figure 7. Map of fruit and vegetable market registered in MarketMaker. Click this LINK to view all the search results. 

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Merchant Wholesalers

Definition of Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Merchant Wholesalers

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Merchant Wholesalers (NAICS 424480) “comprise establishments primarily engaged in the wholesale merchant distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html).

Examples of establishments listed by the Bureau of Census includes the following:

  • Berries, fresh, merchant wholesalers;
  • Fresh fruits, vegetables, and berries merchant wholesalers;
  • Fruits, fresh, merchant wholesalers;
  • Health foods, fresh fruits, and vegetables, merchant wholesalers;
  • Produce, fresh, merchant wholesalers;
  • Salads, prepackaged, merchant wholesalers; and
  • Vegetables, fresh, merchant wholesalers.”

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

Fruits-Vegetables-Wholesalers-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

The number of jobs in the industry has been trending upward. On average, the industry directly created more than 89,000 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 17.4 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 2). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.38 and 0.53 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States have been slowly rising during the later part of the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $56,400 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Fruits-Vegetables--Wholesalers-Workers-Wages-GOM
Figure 2. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been slowly increasing during the later part of the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged $51,630 per person or 91.5 percent of the national average (Figure 2). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 78.7 and 82.2 percent of the national average, respectively.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Feb. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 71.9 percent were males (Figure 3). About 28.1 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men and fewer women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Merchant-Wholesalers-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 3. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also grouped workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 4). The majority of the workers and owners are White (54.6%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (27.5%), African American (9.7%), and Asian (6.6%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer White, (46.6%) and Asian (3.2%), more Hispanic (33.9%) and African American (15.3%) people are working in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Merchant-Wholesalers-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 4. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also classified workers and owners by age (Figure 5). Almost one out of 4 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners comprised of 26.1 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 23.1 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise 27.3 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States have similar age distribution.

Fruit-Vegetable-Merchant-Wholesalers-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 5. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors.
Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.
Legend: QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

If you need an online database of these businesses, you can perform the following search at the Mississippi MarketMaker (https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/) or other member states (https://foodmarketmaker.com/):

States: AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, or WY » Type: Wholesaler » Profile: Wholesaler > Fruit & Vegetable

More than 5,600 “fruit and vegetable wholesalers“ registered their business profiles in MarketMaker. Click this LINK to view the search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by relevance, or by the distance to your current location. In Mississippi and Alabama, there are 33 and 40 “fruit and vegetable wholesalers registered in MarketMaker, respectively.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Fruit and Vegetable Canning, Pickling, and Drying Businesses

Definition of Fruit and Vegetable Canning, Pickling, and Drying

Fruit and vegetable canning, pickling, and drying (NAICS 31142) include “establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing canned, pickled, and dried fruits, vegetables, and specialty foods. Establishments in this industry may package the dried or dehydrated ingredients they make with other purchased ingredients. Examples of products are canned juices; canned baby foods; canned soups (except seafood); canned dry beans; canned tomato-based sauces, such as catsup, salsa, chili sauce, spaghetti sauce, barbeque sauce, and tomato paste; pickles and relishes; jams and jellies; dried soup mixes and bouillon; and sauerkraut.” (https://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/index.html)

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

The overall trend in the number of jobs in the industry has been downward. On average the industry directly created more than 91,000 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). All the Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 9.3 percent of all the jobs during the period (Figure 2). The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.24 and 0.17 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The average wages, salaries, and earnings in the industry in the entire United States has been slowly rising over the period. The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $61,544 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1).

Among the workers in the industry in the Gulf of Mexico States, the average wages, salaries, and earnings have been declining more frequently during the period. The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged $63,776 per person or 103.7 percent of the national average (Figure 2). During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 62.7 and 62.4 percent of the national average, respectively.

Fruits-Vegetables-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. U.S. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Fruits-Vegetables-Workers-Wages-GOM

Figure 2. Gulf of Mexico Region Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Feb. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 61.6 percent were males (Figure 3). About 38.4 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men and fewer women worked and owned these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Canning-Pickling-Drying-Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 3. Gender Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also grouped workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 4). The majority of the workers and owners are White (57%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (29.5%), and African American (8.3%). In the Gulf States, relatively more African American, and fewer White, Hispanic, and Asian people are employed in these businesses.

Fruit-Vegetable-Canning-Pickling-Drying-Workers-Race-USA-GOM
Figure 4. Race or Ethnic Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Feb. 2018) also classified workers and owners by age (Figure 5). Almost three out of 10 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The “45-54” year-old workers and owners consisted of 26.7 percent of the total. The “35-44” year-old group added 20.1 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise 23.8 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are relatively older than the national average.

Fruit-Vegetable-Canning-Pickling-Drying-Workers-Age--USA-GOMFigure 5. Age Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

If you need an online database of these businesses, you can perform the following search at the Mississippi MarketMaker (https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/) or other member states (https://foodmarketmaker.com/):

States: AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, or WY » Type: Processor/Packing Shed » Profile: Processor/Packing Shed > Fruit & Vegetable Products

More than 1,700 local “fruit and vegetable processors“ registered their business profiles in MarketMaker. Click this LINK to view the search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by relevance, or by the distance to your current location.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker.

 

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Charter Boat for-Hire in the Gulf of Mexico and United States

Definition of Charter Boat for-Hire

Scenic and Sightseeing Transportation, Water (NAICS 487210) code includes charter boat for-hire (https://www.naics.com/). The “Scenic and Sightseeing Transportation, Water” industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing scenic and sightseeing transportation on water. The services provided are usually local and involve same-day return to the place of origin. Some illustrative examples include airboat (i.e., swamp buggy) operation, excursion boat operation, charter fishing boat services, harbor sightseeing tours, dinner cruises.”

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

The industry directly created, on average, 21,868 jobs per year in the United States since 2001 (Figure 1). All the Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 23 percent of all the jobs during the period. The activities in Mississippi and Alabama during the same period added 0.5 and 0.7 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $35,937 per person during the entire period under consideration (Figure 1). The annual earnings of workers and owners in the Gulf of Mexico States during the period averaged $35,927 per person or 99.9 percent of the national average. During the same period, Mississippi and Alabama workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 78.3 and 77 percent of the national average, respectively.

U.S. Employment & Wages, Salaries & Earnings in Charter Boats for-Hire
Figure 1. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Jan. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 65.6 percent were males (Figure 2). About 34.4 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men owned and worked at these businesses.

Socio-demographic Characteristics of workers and owners of charter boats for-hire.
Figure 2. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Gender. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

 

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The latest industrial overview posted by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also grouped workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 3). Majority of the workers and owners are White (74%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (10.7%), and African American (7.6%). In the Gulf States, relatively more White, Hispanic and African American, and fewer Asian are engaged in these businesses.

Socio-demographic characteristics of workers and owners of charter boats for-hire.
Figure 3. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Race or Ethnicity. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com

 

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also classified workers and owners by age (Figure 4). More than three out of 10 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The 45-55 years old workers and owners consisted of 15.9 percent of the total. The 35-44 years old group added 18.4 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise 35.1 percent of the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are relatively older than the national average.

Socio-demographic characteristics of Workers and owners of charter boats for-hire.
Figure 4. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Age. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com

Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

If you need an online database of these businesses, you can perform the following search at the Mississippi MarketMaker (https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/) or other member states (https://foodmarketmaker.com/):

States: AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, or WY » Type: Tourism » Profile: Tourism > Fishing Charter

More than 1,000 local charter boats for-hire registered their business profiles in MarketMaker. Click this LINK to view the search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by relevance, or by the distance to your current location.

 

Employment, Incomes, and Characteristics of Workers and Owners of Marinas in the Gulf of Mexico and United States

Definition of Marinas 

NAICS code 713930 represents the marina industry (https://www.naics.com/). It “comprises establishments, commonly known as marinas, engaged in operating docking and storage facilities for pleasure craft owners, with or without one or more related activities, such as retailing fuel and marine supplies; and repairing, maintaining, or renting pleasure boats.”

Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings

The marina industry directly provided, on average, 52,788 jobs per year in the United States. (Figure 1). The five Gulf of Mexico States (AL, FL, LA, MS, and TX) contributed about 22.6 percent of all the marina jobs during the period. The marina activities in Mississippi and Alabama added 0.4 and 1.3 percent of the total number of jobs, respectively.

Marinas-Workers-Wages-USA
Figure 1. Annual Employment and Wages, Salaries, and Earnings of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors. QCEW U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

The combined wages, salaries, and proprietor earnings (at constant 2017 prices) of all the QCEW employees, non-QCEW employees, self-employed, and extended proprietors averaged $34,292 per person (Figure 1). The annual pay of workers and owners in the five Gulf of Mexico States averaged $35,149 per person or 102.7 percent of the national average. Mississippi and Alabama commercial workers and owners received average annual pay amounting to 66.3 and 87.1 percent of the national average, respectively.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Gender

The most recent industrial overview released by EMSI (Jan. 2018) showed that among workers and owners, 53.6 percent were males (Figure 2). About 46.4 percent of the workers and owners were females. In the Gulf States, relatively more men worked and owned the marina businesses.

Marinas--Workers-Gender--USA-GOM
Figure 2. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Gender. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Race or Ethnicity

The recent industrial overview disseminated by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also categorized the workers and owners by race or ethnicity (Figure 3). Majority of the workers and owners are Whites (80.8%), followed by Hispanic or Latino (8.4%), and African Americans (6.4%). In the Gulf States, relatively fewer Whites, more Hispanic and African Americans are engaged in the marina business.

Marinas-Workers-Race--USA-GOM
Figure 3. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Race or Ethnicity. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Distribution of Workers and Owners by Age

The technical overview published by EMSI (Jan. 2018) also classified the workers and owners by age (Figure 4). More than two out of 10 of the workers and owners are 55 years old and above. The 45-55 years old workers and owners consisted of 21.5 percent of the total. The 35-44 years old group added 19.7 percent of the total. The younger workers and owners comprise the rest. The workers and owners in the Gulf States are relatively older than the national average.

Marinas-Workers-Age--USA-GOM
Figure 4. Distribution of QCEW Employees, Non-QCEW Employees, Self-Employed, and Extended Proprietors by Age. QCEW – U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Source of raw data: EMSI. https://e.economicmodeling.com.

Marinas Registered in MarketMaker

There are no marinas registered in MarketMaker. An online directory of marinas by state, e.g., Mississippi, can be found at https://marinas.com/browse/marina/US/MS. Marinas are where most of the local charter boats for-hire are docked.

If you need an online database of local charter-boats for-hire, you can perform the following search at the Mississippi MarketMaker (https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/) or other member states (https://foodmarketmaker.com/):

States: AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, or WY » Type: Tourism » Profile: Tourism > Fishing Charter

More than 1,000 local charter boats for-hire registered their business profiles in MarketMaker. Click this LINK to view the search results online. You can sort the results alphabetically, by relevance, or by the distance to your current location.

Read more at http://extension.msstate.edu/newsletters/mississippi-marketmaker