Longterm monthly commercial landings of shrimp species in the Gulf of Mexico

Shrimp-landings-monthly-GOM
This chart shows clearly the downward long-term trend in the monthly Gulf of Mexico shrimp landings. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

Shrimp-landings-monthly-LA
This second chart also shows the continuous decline in the long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in Louisiana. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

Shrimp-landings-monthly-MS
This third chart also exhibits the continuous decline in the long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in Mississippi. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

Shrimp-landings-monthly-FLWC
This fourth chart also shows the continuous decline in the long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in the Florida West Coast. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service

Shrimp-landings-monthly-TX
This fifth chart depicts an almost steady long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in Texas. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

Shrimp-landings-monthly-AL
This sixth chart illustrates the increasing long-term trend in the monthly shrimp landings in Alabama. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries Service.

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Monthly Gulf of Mexico States Shrimp Ex-Vessel Prices from Jan 2013 to June 2018

The prices shown below are official data from NOAA Fisheries. The charts show the dockside prices of various shrimp products landed in the five Gulf of Mexico states from Jan. 2013 to June 2018.

The vertical or Y-axis shows the ex-vessel prices expressed in dollars per pound of headless shrimp. The ex-vessel prices of shrimp products in heads on forms are much lower than those reported prices. You need the yield ratio from heads on to headless forms in order to convert those prices.

The horizontal or X-axis shows the month and year the shrimp products were landed.

All prices are in dollars per pound. Penaeid species only, headless. The source of raw data is the NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. The following legends are used: Eastern – Florida West Coast, Northern – Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and Western – Texas, and Count – the number of shrimps per pound.

shrimp-evp-Northernshrimp-evp-Westernshrimp-evp-Eastern

Monthly Gulf of Mexico States Shrimp Landings from June 1995 to June 2018

ShrimpLandingsMSJune

A total of 879,000 pounds (headless) of all shrimp species were landed in Mississippi in June 2018, which was 59 percent of the average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The annual shrimp landings in Mississippi since 2011 averaged 1.479 million pounds.

ShrimpLandingsALJune
About 1.578 million pounds (headless) of all shrimp species were landed in Alabama in June 2018, which was 15 percent more than the average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The annual shrimp landings in Alabama since 2011 averaged 1.376 million pounds.

ShrimpLandingsGulfJune

Around 10.428 million pounds (headless) of all shrimp species were landed in all five Gulf of Mexico states in June 2018, which was 28 percent less than the average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The annual shrimp landings in the entire Gulf region since 2011 averaged 14.386 million pounds.

Landings in thousand pounds (Penaied species only, headless). Source of raw data:  NOAA Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Legend: 0 – no landings or not sufficient dealers reporting.

Mississippi June shrimp landings lowest since after the oil spill!

The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources (http://www.dmr.ms.gov/) opened the shrimp season in MIssissippi on June 6, 2018. During opening day, officials of the DMR reported about 254 boats in the Mississippi Sound (http://www.wlox.com).

A total of 879,000 pounds (headless) of all shrimp species were landed in Mississippi in June 2018, which was 59 percent of the average landings since after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The annual shrimp landings in Mississippi since 2011 averaged 1.5 million pounds.

ShrimpLandingsMSJuneSource of raw data: NOAA Fisheries.

 

Economic contributions of commercial yellowtail snapper fishing

Yellowtail-Snapper2
Figure 1. Yellowtail snapper (Ocyurus chrysurus, Bloch, 1791). The photo was taken by Amanda E. Jefferson.

Commercial Landings

The long-term annual commercial yellowtail snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states are shown below. Since 2011, the Florida West Coast supplied 94.5% of the whole yellowtail snapper domestic landings averaging 2.0 million pounds and valued at $5.9 million annually. The Eastern Atlantic states provided the rest of the total domestic landings. Dockside prices of yellowtail snapper averaged about $3.00 per pound during the past six years.

Yellowtail-Snapper-Annual-Landings-GOM

Figure 2. Annual commercial yellowtail snapper landings in the Gulf of Mexico states. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries. Last visited: July 5, 2018. http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/.

Economic Contributions

The economic contribution commercial yellowtail snapper fishing makes locally, region-wide, or nation-wide is crucial information in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2016. The economic analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The annual commercial dockside values of yellowtail snapper in the Gulf of Mexico states in 2016 reached $6.9 million, which was 22.7% more than the average yearly dockside values in the region since 2011. The total output contribution of commercial Yellowtail snapper fishing in 2016 amounted to $13.2 million. The yellowtail snapper commercial fishing sustained 183 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $4.7 million in the Gulf regional economy.

The yellowtail snapper commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. More than $800,000 was projected to have been paid by households and businesses in 2016 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were anticipated to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2016 amounting to almost $400,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

How to Use Instagram Like a Millennial For Your Business — Marketo Marketing Blog

I am a millennial. And as such, I am fluent in social media. Social media is like a language you invent with your sibling that only the two of you speak and your parents barely understand. Everyone, even the smallest of businesses, has jumped on social media and attempted to utilize any channel they can…

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