Commercial Blue Crab Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

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According to Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/), blue crabs (Figure 1) “range from Nova Scotia and Maine to northern Argentina and are found throughout the Gulf. There are likely two different blue crab stocks in the Gulf: a Florida or Eastern Gulf stock along the Florida coast (centered around Tampa Bay) and a Western Gulf stock from central Texas to Apalachicola Bay (centered in Louisiana). Blue crab larvae are found in salty offshore waters. Post-larvae move into shallow, lower salinity estuarine waters. Juveniles remain in the upper and middle estuary in areas with marsh and sea grass, oyster reefs, as well as soft mud bottoms, all of which provide some protection from predators. As juvenile crabs grow larger, they move to fresher waters. Adult blue crabs are found on a variety of bottom types including submerged vegetation, unvegetated sediments, and marsh grass in fresh, estuarine, and shallow oceanic waters throughout the Gulf.”

57CrabBlueTemp1000Figure 1. Blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). Source: Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/).

Economic Contributions of Blue Crab Commercial Fishing

Economic impact analysis shows the economic contribution an industry makes locally, region-wide, nation-wide, or globally. This information is crucial in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of blue crab commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2015. The economic impact analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

The IMPLAN economic model generates economic impact estimates regarding output or sales, employment or jobs, labor income, value added and tax revenues. The income, value-added, and output impacts are expressed in dollars for the year specified by the user. Output or sales are the gross sales by businesses within the economic region affected by an activity. Labor income includes personal income including wages and salaries and proprietors’ income or income from self-employment. Employment impacts are expressed in terms of a mix of both full-time and part-time jobs. Value-added is the contribution made to the value of seafood products at each stage of harvesting, processing, and distribution.

The total economic impact is the sum of direct, indirect and induced impacts. The direct effects express the economic impacts in the sector in which the expenditure was initially made. Indirect effects result from changes in the economic activity of other industrial sectors which supply goods or services to the commercial fishing industry. Induced effects are the product of personal consumption expenditures by industry employees.

Blue-Crab-Gulf-economic-contributionFigure 2. Total economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2015 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set to 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

The annual commercial dockside values of blue crab in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2015 reached $74.5 million, which was about 17% more than the average annual dockside values during the last five years. The total economic contribution of commercial blue crab fishing in 2015 amounted to $141.4 million (Figure 2). The blue crab commercial fishing created 1,995 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $50.5 million in the Gulf regional economy. The blue crab commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. About $8.6 million were estimated to have been paid by households and businesses in 2015 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were expected to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2015 amounting to $4.2 million as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Blue Crab Commercial Landings

Figure 3 shows the commercial landings of blue crabs from the Gulf of Mexico Region since 1990. During the last five years, the Gulf States supplied 32.3 % of the entire blue crab domestic landings averaging 52.5 million pounds and valued at $63.7 million annually. Louisiana is the largest producing state in the Gulf of Mexico, supplying more than 26.4% of all domestically-caught blue crabs, and 81.6% of all the blue crabs harvested in the Gulf of Mexico region.
Blue-Crab-Landings-Gulf-Annual.jpgFigure 3. Annual blue crab commercial landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Blue-crab-Landings-Gulf-Monthly.jpgFigure 4. Monthly blue crab commercial landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Blue Crab Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

In 2015, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of blue crabs reached about 52.6 million pounds. This shellfish species was caught year-round with most of the landings occurring during the summer months (Figure 4). The declining commercial landings of blue crabs led to rising dockside values, especially during the last five years following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 (Figure 5).

There are 4,309 fishing businesses, seafood processing plants, seafood and fish markets, and seafood restaurants registered in MarketMaker nationwide which harvest, process, sell and serve blue crabs in the United States. Click this LINK to view the search results online.  The online database of blue crab businesses can be sorted by relevance, distance and alphabetically. You can also limit online searches by state, county, city or number of miles from a specified location, and type of business.

Blue-Crab-Landing-Values-Gulf-AnnualFigure 5. Annual blue crab commercial dockside values in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Commercial Southern Flounder Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

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Economic Contributions of Southern Flounder Commercial Fishing

Economic impact analysis shows the economic contribution an industry makes locally, region-wide, nation-wide, or globally. This economic information is crucial in making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States were used to estimate the economic contribution of white shrimp commercial fishing to the Gulf of Mexico regional economy in 2015. The economic impact analysis used sector 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data.

Table showing the economic contributions of commercial southern flounder fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States
Figure 1. Total economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2015 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set to 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

The IMPLAN economic model generates economic impact estimates regarding output or sales, employment or jobs, labor income, value added and tax revenues. The income, value-added, and output impacts are expressed in dollars for the year specified by the user. Output or sales are the gross sales by businesses within the economic region affected by an activity. Labor income includes personal income including wages and salaries and proprietors’ income or income from self-employment. Employment impacts are expressed in terms of a mix of both full-time and part-time jobs. Value-added is the contribution made to the value of seafood products at each stage of harvesting, processing, and distribution. The total economic impact is the sum of direct, indirect and induced impacts. The direct effects express the economic impacts in the sector in which the expenditure was initially made. Indirect effects result from changes in the economic activity of other industrial sectors which supply goods or services to the commercial fishing industry. Induced effects are the product of personal consumption expenditures by industry employees.

The annual commercial dockside values of Southern flounder in the Gulf of Mexico Region in 2015 reached $0.6 million, which is about twice the average annual dockside values during the last five years. The total economic contribution of commercial southern flounder fishing in 2015 amounted to $1.2 million (Figure 1). The Southern flounder commercial fishing created 17 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $0.4 million in the Gulf regional economy. The Southern flounder commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. About $71,000 were estimated to have been paid by households and businesses in 2015 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were expected to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2015 amounting to $35,000 as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

A drawing of a Southern flounder
Figure 2. Southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma)Source: Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/).

Southern Flounder Commercial Landings

According to Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/), Southern flounder (Figure 2) “are found in coastal waters of the western Atlantic Ocean, from North Carolina to the mouth of the Rio Grande River and southward into Mexico. In the Gulf, they’re usually found west of the Mississippi River. Southern flounder is mainly an inshore species but lives in a variety of habitats, depending on gender, life stage, and environmental factors. Larvae hatch offshore in the water column; currents transport them inshore to shallow estuaries and tidal rivers. Juveniles settle in shallow, grassy areas of estuaries where food is abundant. Adults spend the warmer months over muddy bottoms in upper estuaries and the fall and winter offshore (for spawning).”

Figure 3 shows the commercial landings of Southern flounder from the Gulf of Mexico Region since 2000. During the last five years, the Gulf States supplied 8.4% of the entire Southern flounder domestic landings averaging 138,000 pounds and valued at $314,000 annually. Louisiana is the largest producing state in the Gulf of Mexico, but nationwide, North Carolina supplied more than 94% of all domestically-caught Southern flounder.

A chart showing the annual Gulf of Mexico Commercial Southern Flounder Landings.
Figure 3. Annual Southern flounder commercial landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

A chart showing the monthly Gulf of Mexico Commercial Southern Flounder Landings
Figure 4. Monthly Southern flounder commercial landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Southern Flounder Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

In 2015, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of Southern flounder reached about 212,000 pounds. This fish species was caught year-round with most of the landings occurring from June  to November (Figure 4). There are 136 fishing businesses, processing plants, seafood and fish markets, and seafood restaurants registered in MarketMaker which harvest, process, sell, and serve flounder in the United States. Click this LINK to view the search results online.

Commercial Menhaden Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

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Economic Contribution of Menhaden Commercial Fishing

Economic impact analysis shows the contributions an industry makes locally, region-wide, or nation-wide. This information is necessary for making private investment decisions, formulating government policy, and developing research and extension programs for the industry. The Gulf of Mexico regional economic model was developed using the IMPLAN (http://implan.com/) software and the 2013 input-output data for the five Gulf States. The sector employed in the analysis was number 17 or commercial fishing of the 2013 IMPLAN input-output data. Due to the lack of reliable data, the contributions of menhaden processing, wholesaling, and retailing to the Gulf States economy were not included in the present analysis.

The total commercial landing values in the Gulf of Mexico States in 2015 significantly increased to $138.51 million, which is more than twice the average annual landing value. The total economic contribution of menhaden fishing in 2015 reached $262.8 million (Figure 1). Commercial menhaden fishing created 3,768 jobs and generated labor income amounting to $93.8 million in the Gulf regional economy.

Economic contribution of commercial menhaden fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States
Figure 1. Total economic impact includes direct, indirect and induced effects estimated by using 2015 annual landing values and 2013 IMPLAN data. The local purchases percentage was set to 100%. The number of jobs is rounded off.

The menhaden commercial fishing industry generates annual tax revenues for the Gulf States and the U.S. federal government. A total of $16 million were estimated to have been paid by households and businesses in 2015 to the federal government as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profit tax, and personal income tax. The Gulf States were expected to have collected taxes from households and businesses in 2015 amounting to $7.8 million as social insurance tax, tax on production and imports, corporate profits tax, and personal tax.

Menhaden Commercial Landings

According to Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/), Gulf menhaden (Figure 2) “are found from the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, across the western and northern Gulf to Tampa Bay, Florida. They’re most abundant from eastern Texas to western Alabama. Menhaden are very boney and oily and have no appeal as food. However, they support a very important reduction fishery—meaning the whole fish is “reduced” to produce fishmeal, oil, and solubles that go into all kinds of products, from aquaculture and agriculture feed and fish oil pills to pet food and fertilizers.

An image of a Gulf menhaden
Figure 2. Gulf menhaden (Brevoortia patronus) eggs float in loose groups near the surface of nearshore Gulf waters. Larvae move inshore, and early juveniles live near marsh edges of the estuary where they can find plenty of food and protection from predators. Juvenile menhaden spend most of their first year of life in brackish and near-freshwater estuaries and rivers. Adults are found in nearshore waters of the Gulf. Both juveniles and adults typically live in open water over bottoms with no vegetation. Menhaden swim and feed in huge schools, usually made up of the same size and age of fish.” Source: Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/).

Figures 3 and 4 show the long-term commercial landings and percent share of menhaden from the Gulf of Mexico States. On average, the Gulf States supplied about 68% of total domestic landings amounting to 1.29 billion pounds and valued at $66.97 million per year. Louisiana (82%) is the largest producing state in the Gulf of Mexico, followed by Mississippi (18%). The bulk of the menhaden landings occurs starting in April until October.

Gulf of Mexico States Menhaden Landings
Figure 3. Annual menhaden commercial landings and exvessel values in the Gulf of Mexico States. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).
Percent of Mississippi and Gulf States to United States Menhaden Landings
Figure 4. Percent of Mississippi and Gulf States to United States menhaden landings. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Commercial Catfish Production in the United States

Commercial Catfish Production

Figure 2 shows the commercial catfish production annual sales in the United States since 2010. A total of 60,790 water surface acres is currently being used in catfish production in the United States in 2017. About 56.6% of the total water surface acreage are in Mississippi, 24.7% are in Alabama, 8.2% are in Arkansas, and 3.1% are in Texas.  The rest of the water surface acres used in catfish production are located in California, North Carolina, and other states.

Figure 2. A chart showing the United States Annual Catfish Sales
Figure 2. Annual commercial production catfish sales in the United States, 2010-2016. Source of raw data: USDA-National Agricultural Statistics Service (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov).

Top Catfish Producing States

The top catfish producing states are Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, and Texas, as shown in Figure 3. Other states growing catfish include California, North Carolina, and the Other States. The Other States include state estimates not shown and states suppressed due to disclosure.

Figure 3. a pie chart showing the annual commercial catfish sales in the United States by producing states in 2016. Source of raw data: USDA-Economics, Statistics, and Market Information System. http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu

Figure 3. Annual commercial production catfish sales in the United States by producing states in 2016. Source of raw data: USDA-Economics, Statistics, and Market Information System (http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu).

Catfish Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

There are more than 650 catfish farming businesses, processing plants, fish markets, and seafood restaurants registered in MarketMaker which harvest, process, sell, and serve catfish in the United States. Click this internet LINK to view the online catfish directory. Please bookmark this link for your future use. To search for catfish businesses in MarketMaker, go to https://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/. Click Search. Then type catfish in the space under Search MarketMaker.

Is this Newsletter beneficial to you, your business or your office?

Please participate in a two-minute assessment of the economic impacts of horticulture and marine economics research and extension program on your household, business or office at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/hortmarine.

Watermelon Production in Mississippi and United States

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Annual Volume and Value of Watermelon Production

According to U.S. Department of Agriculture, the major watermelon producing states in the United States are Texas, Florida, Georgia, and California (http://www.agmrc.org/commodities-products/vegetables/watermelon/). Figure 2 shows the annual volume and value of watermelon fresh market production in the United States. During the past five years, annual production in all producing states averaged 3.5 billion pounds with annual value around $501.7 million.

United States Watermelon Fresh Market Production
Figure 2. Annual volume and value of United States watermelon production.
Source: USDA (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/)

Figure 3 shows the yearly quantity and value of watermelons fresh market production in Mississippi. The market share of Mississippi to the total domestic watermelon production averaged less than 1%. Annual production in the state was around 3.8 million pounds, while annual value was about $4.3 million.

Figure 3. Mississippi Watermelon Fresh market Production.
Figure 3. Annual volume and value of Mississippi watermelon production.
Source: USDA (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/)

Mississippi watermelons were sold at relatively lower farm-gate prices than in all producing states. Figure 4 shows the average farm-gate prices in Mississippi and United States. During the past five years, Mississippi watermelons were sold at an average price of $11.42 per CWT, which was about 86% of the average prices in all producing states. The average farm-gate price in all producing states was $13.82 per CWT or $1.38 per pound.

Figure 4. Average watermelon fresh market price.
Figure 4. Average watermelon fresh market farm-gate prices.
Source: USDA (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/)

Watermelon Growers Registered in MarketMaker

There are 542 watermelon growers registered in MarketMaker member states. Click this LINK to view the search results online.  In Mississippi, 17 watermelon growers are registered in MarketMaker, as shown by this online LINK.

Is this Newsletter beneficial to you, your business or your office?

Please participate in a two-minute assessment of the economic impacts of horticulture and marine economics research and extension program on your household, business or office at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/hortmarine.

Commercial Brown Shrimp Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

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Brown Shrimp Commercial Landings

According to Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/), brown shrimp (Fig. 2) “are found in the western Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to the Florida Keys and throughout the northern Gulf to the northwestern Yucatan in Mexico”.

Fig. 2. Brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus Aztecus). U.S. wild-caught brown shrimp is a smart seafood choice because it is sustainably managed and responsibly harvested under U.S. regulations. Source: Gulf FINFO (http://gulffishinfo.org/).

Fig. 3 shows the commercial landings of brown shrimp from the Gulf of Mexico Region since 1990. This database was compiled from the NOAA Fisheries website. The Gulf States supplied 93 percent of the commercially wild-caught brown shrimp in the United States, amounting to 106.7 million pounds and valued at $217.8 million per year during the last five years. Texas is the largest producing state of wild-caught brown shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico, followed by Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida.

Chart showing the Gulf of Mexico Region Commercial Brown Shrimp Landings
Fig. 3. Annual brown shrimp commercial landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region by Producing State. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Shrimp Businesses Registered in MarketMaker

In 2015, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of brown shrimp reached about 107.5 million pounds. This shrimp species was caught year-round with most of the landings occuring from May to October (Fig. 4). There are more than 1,500 fishing businesses, processing plants, seafood and fish markets, and seafood restaurants registered in MarketMaker which harvest, process, and sell shrimp in the United States. Click this LINK to view the search results online.

Is this Newsletter beneficial to you, your business or your office?

Please participate in a two-minute assessment of the economic impacts of horticulture and marine economics research and extension program on your household, business or office at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/hortmarine.

Chart showing the monthly Gulf of Mexico Commercial Brown Shrimp Lnadings in 2015.
Fig. 4. Monthly brown shrimp commercial landings in the Gulf of Mexico Region. Source of raw data: NOAA Fisheries (http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/).

Create and Update Business Profiles in MarketMaker

Businesses registered in MarketMaker

As of March 2017, more than 1.3 million food businesses were registered in MarketMaker, as shown below. In Mississippi MarketMaker only, more than 12,000 food businesses were registered.

Businesses registered in MarketMaker (03/31/17)
Businesses registered in Mississippi MarketMaker

How many food businesses are registered in your county?

Do you know how many and what businesses are registered in the county where you work or reside? Please follow the procedures listed below to find the answers:

  1. Mississippi MarketMaker is located at http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/.
  2. Go to Search.
  3. Select Mississippi.
  4. Select your County.
  5. Click Search.

How do you register your food business?

  1. MarketMaker is located at http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/.
  2. Click Register and type your email address and password in the spaces under Register. Write your username name (email address) and password in a safe and secure place.
  3. Complete specific details about your business. Upload some good photos, and add your Facebook and Twitter accounts.

How do you search for a business profile in MarketMaker? 

Checking a business profile in MarketMaker is an easy task.

  1. Click Search and type the name of the business in the space under Search MarketMaker.
  2. You can check your own business using this procedure. This is how your business profile looks like to web users. Make sure it looks good online.

How do you update your business profile in Mississippi MarketMaker?

Updating your business profile is a good business practice. You can upload new photos, delete old photos, edit contact information, add new products and services, and add social media networks.

  1. MarketMaker is located at http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/.
  2. Click Register and then click UPDATE YOUR PROFILE.
  3. Type your email address and password in the spaces under Account Login.
  4. Be prepared to enter updated information (and pictures) about your business.

What are the benefits in registering your business?

  1. Producers register their businesses in MarketMaker because food buyers of all types access its national and state databases to find products and services to meet their specific needs.
  2. Through MarketMaker, producers can reach more buyers and more efficiently form profitable business alliances.
  3. Registered businesses can participate in Buy/Sell Forum.
  4. Registered businesses can use the MarketMaker logo.

Web Users and Views of Mississippi MarketMaker

More than 36,000 web users visited Mississippi MarketMaker since May 2014. These web users visited more than 76,000 pages and opened about two pages per visit.

Google Web Statistics
Google Web Analytics of Mississippi MarketMaker from May 2014 to present.
Source: Mississippi MarketMaker (http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/).


Participate in Buy/Sell Forum

  1. MarketMaker is located at http://ms.foodmarketmaker.com/.
  2. Go to Buy/Sell Forum.
  3. Click Sell.
  4. Click Picayune Blueberry Farm.

Businesses can use the MarketMaker logo? 

The MarketMaker logo


Is this Newsletter beneficial to you, your business or your office?

Please participate in a two-minute assessment of the economic impacts of horticulture and marine economics research and extension program on your household, business or office at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/hortmarine.

Commercial White Shrimp Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico States

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During the last five years, the Gulf States supplied 94.3% of the wild American white shrimp amounting to 91.3 million pounds and valued at $204.2 million per year. Louisiana is the largest producing state of wild American white shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico, followed by Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida.

White-Shrimp-Annual-Gulf

In 2015, the Gulf-wide commercial landings of white shrimp reached about 86.1 million pounds. This shrimp species was caught year-round with most of the landings occurring from August to December. There are more than 3,300 fishing businesses, processing plants, seafood and fish markets, and seafood restaurants registered in MarketMaker which harvest, process, sell, and serve shrimp in the United States. Click this LINK to view the search results online.

White-Shrimp-Monthly-Gulf

 

Pecan Production in Mississippi and United States

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Pecan Growers Registered in MarketMaker 

There are 221 pecan growers registered in MarketMaker member states. Click this LINK to view the search results online.  In Mississippi, 19 pecan growers are registered, as shown by this online LINK.

Annual Volume and Value of Pecan Production

According to USDA Quick Stats, the major pecan-producing states in 2015 were Georgia (36%), New Mexico (33%), Texas (13%), and Arizona (9%). Fig. 1 shows the annual volume and value of utilized and in-shell pecan production in the United States since 2007. Annual pecan production in all producing states averaged 280 million pounds while annual value was around $500 million.

pecan-USAFig. 1. Annual volume and value of United States pecan production
Source: USDA (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/)

Fig. 2 shows the yearly quantity and value of utilized and in-shell pecan production in Mississippi since 2007. The market share of Mississippi to the total domestic pecan production averaged less than 1% since 2007. Annual pecan production in the state was around 2.8 million pounds while annual value was about $3.5 million.

pecan-MS
Fig. 3. Annual volume and value of Mississippi pecan production
Source: USDA (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/)

Mississippi pecans were sold at significantly lower prices than in all producing states. Fig. 3 shows the average prices of pecan production in Mississippi and United States since 2007. Mississippi pecans were sold at an average price of $1.28 per pound, which was about 73% of the average prices in all producing states. The average price of pecans in all producing states was $1.79 per pound.

pecan-pricesFig. 3. Average prices of pecan production
Source: USDA (https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/)